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Просмотр полной версии : Хрещатий Яр / Khreshchaty Yar - Traditional Songs from the Ukraine, Vol. II (2002)


Darkman
16.05.2010, 06:35
Khreshchaty Yar
Traditional Songs from the Ukraine, Vol.2
Face Music FM 50032, 2002

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01. Vesilnyi marsh, Bukovina region - 1:38
02. Arkan, Carpathian - 2:34
03. Staryi hutsul, Carpathian - 3:07
04. Chaban, Bukovina region - 2:52
05. Vesilny melodiy, Carpathian - 1:45
06. Hutsulsky melodiy, Carpathian - 3:20
07. Vesilni pryspivky, Kiev region - 1:50
08. Podils'ka polka, Podolia region - 2:14
09. Oie ne khody da rozkudryavchyk, Cherkasy region - 1:35
10. Polis'ka polka, Polissya region - 1:49
11. Vinochok tantsyouvalnykh melodiy, Central Ukraine - 2:19
12. Oie hay, hay zelenen'ky, Central Ukraine - 1:36
13. Pleskach, Central Ukraine - 1:17
14. Yak sluzhyv ya v pana, Central Ukraine - 3:09
15. Hrechanyky, Central Ukraine - 1:45
16. Hopak, Central Ukraine - 2:48
17. Da kosyv bat'ko, Poltava region - 2:29
18. Ivanku, Ivanku, Western Ukraine (Carpathian) - 1:59
19. Kosarska, Carpathian - 1:02
20. Do ney iduchy, Carpathian - 0:58
21. Vid ney iduchy, Carpathian - 1:11
22. Hutsuls'kiy nahrash, Carpathian - 0:58
23. Velykodna melodiya, Carpathian - 2:40
24. Tantsyouvalna melodiya, Central Ukraine - 1:20
25. Lemkivsky kolomiyky, Lemko region (Carpathian) - 2:00
26. Viye viter, Central Ukraine - 3:48
27. Oie pozvol pan khazyan, Central Ukraine - 1:12
28. Ishla divon'ka, Central Ukraine - 2:08
29. Nebo y zemlya, Central Ukraine - 1:49
30. Oie na richtsy na Yordany, Cherkasy region - 1:08

Volodymyr Budz (leader) - voice, bandura (type of psaltery), accordion, sopilka (Ukrainian duct flute, 30-40 cm long, with 6 fingerholes), tylynka (large end-blown flute without fingerholes made of a 60-80 cm long metal tube), frilka (small duct flute with 6 fingerholes made of a 20-50 cm long metal tube), sosulya (vessel flute, uses to imitate bird calls such as that of the cuckoo), little bell
Volodymyr Biletsky - voice, soloist, drum, buben (frame drum)
Valentyna Bogdanova - voice, soloist
Ivan Volynets - voice, soloist
Valery Golub - folk fiddle
Vasil Palanjuk - voice, tsymbaly = cimbalom (hammered dulcimer), sopilka (Ukrainian duct flute), tylynka (large end-blown flute without fingerholes made of a 60-80 cm long metal tube), dvodenzivka (double duct flute), rebro (pan pipe), sosulya (vessel flute or cuckoo), drymba (jew’s harp), bukhalo (drum), spoons, bottles and washboard
Anatoliy Kurylo - voice, soloist, drum, "hupalo" ("hooter")
Yuri Berbenyuk - double bass
Guest:
Ivan Tkalenko - bandura

MP3, 320 kbps including full scans


Comment: За альбом ... thanks! / спасибо, Аmbrose... :13axoc5:

[*** Скрытый текст ***]


1. Vesilnyi marsh - Wedding march from the Bukovina region
- Valery Golub: folk fiddle, Vasil Palanjuk: tsymbaly, drum, Volodymyr Budz: sopilka, Yuri Berbenyuk: double bass
This march is being played when the wedding guests arrive.

2. Arkan - Hutsul dance of the men – Carpathian region
- Valery Golub: folk fiddle, Vasil Palanjuk: tsymbaly, drum, Volodymyr Budz: frilka, Yuri Berbenyuk: double bass
Arkan is a ritual dance that goes back to pagan times. Before the hunters set out, they performed this magical dance for a successful hunt.

3. Staryj hutsul - the old Hutsul – Carpathian region
- Valery Golub: folk fiddle, Vasil Palanjuk: tsymbaly, drum, Volodymyr Budz: frilka, Yuri Berbenyuk: double bass
This dance was performed by old men. The musicians compelled the dancers to dance faster and faster.

4. Chaban - Chaban means shepherd – A dance from the Bukovina region
(Bukovina = land of beeches)
- Valery Golub: folk fiddle, Vasil Palanjuk: tsymbaly, drum, Volodymyr Budz: sopilka, Yuri Berbenyuk: double bass
- (Buk = beeches, the land with the many beeches – the centre is the town Chernivtsi) Bukovina once was part of the Mongolian Principality and the Walachy, later on it was integrated into the Habsburg Monarchy. The Southern part is nowadays called Moldavia, in the West there is situated Maramuresch = Marmatia in today's Romania, bordering in the West Transylvania and in the North the Carpathian region.

5. Vesilny melodiy - Hutsul wedding melody from the Carpathian region
- Vasil Palanjuk: tsymbaly (solo)

6. Hutsulsky melodiy - Hutsul melody – Carpathian region
- Valery Golub: folk fiddle, Vasil Palanjuk: tsymbaly, drum, Volodymyr Budz: frilka, Yuri Berbenyuk: double bass
Jaremca is situated in the Hutsul region, South-West of Ivano-Frankovsk at the foot of Mount Hoverla, where the river Prut springs. This is the homeland of the legendary hero "Dovbusa", a kind of Ukrainian Robin Hood. If you want more information on the history of this mountainous population, you should have a look at the legends and stories telling about them. As in older times, mythology is still alive: For example, the fantastic bird-like "Huhuretz" telling fortunes by means of whistling lamenting when you sit at home in front of the open fire. The inhabitants of these wild forests high up in the Carpathian mountains were called "Hutsul". Nowadays, their typical wooden architecture is well known worldwide, especially their churches, which were built in the 17th and 18th centuries in this particular Hutsul style.
"Hutsuls" was the name of a community who lived "high up" in the Transcarpathian mountains and spoke an Ukrainian dialect. After World War I, this region became part of the Austro-Hungarian Empire (after the Constitutional Compromise between Austria and Hungary in 1867) and was divided into a Polish, a Czech and a Romanian dominated affiliation. Those living in the Carpathian foreland of the Ivano-Frankovsk region on both sides of the river Dniestr were called "Boiks". They were also called mountaineers or valley people. They preserved their culture like wedding rites, costumes (shirts, head coverings, long cloaks etc.) and their architecture (two-rooms-houses and churches made from wood). They cultivated land and especially processed corn. Boiks and Hutsuls speaking different Ukrainian dialects (this form of Rusyn-Ukrainia) and belonging to the Greek-Orthodox Church, are actually part of the East-Slavonic population group and of the Romans (also called Ruthenians) who had moved from the Walachy (today's Romania) into the Transcarpathian region in order to establish there a new form of civilization. Later on Germans and also the so-called "Old-Believers" were to follow.
- The race of small horses originating in the Carpathians are called "Hutsulei". They are strong and very good in carrying heavy loads along the difficult mountain paths. A stud farm in Lucina in the today Romanian part of the Bukovina region was already reknown for its breed in the 19th century under Habsburg Monarchy.

7. Vesilny pryspivky - Wedding tune from the Kiev region
- Valentyna Bogdanova: voice (solo)
This song is sung while the wedding guests are being served at the table (table song).

8. Podils'ka polka - dance melody from the Podolia region
- Valery Golub: folk fiddle, Vasil Palanjuk: tsymbaly, Volodymyr Budz: sopilka, Volodymyr Biletsky: buben (frame drum), Yuri Berbenyuk: double bass

9. Oie ne khody da rozkudryavchyk - love song from the Cherkasy region
- Valery Golub: folk fiddle, Vasil Palanjuk: tsymbaly, Volodymyr Budz: accordion, Anatoliy Kurylo: voice (soloist), Volodymyr Biletsky: buben (frame drum), Yuri Berbenyuk: double bass, Valentyna Bogdanova: voice (soloist)
The young girl loves a Cossack and asks her mother for the permission to marry him.

10. Polis'ka polka - dance melody from the Polissya region
- Valery Golub: folk fiddle, Vasil Palanjuk: tsymbaly, Volodymyr Budz: sopilka, Volodymyr Biletsky: buben (frame drum), Yuri Berbenyuk: double bass

11. Vinochok tantsyouvalnykh melodiy - dance melody from Central Ukraine
- Valery Golub: folk fiddle, Vasil Palanjuk: tsymbaly, Volodymyr Budz: sopilka, Volodymyr Biletsky: buben (frame drum), Yuri Berbenyuk: double bass

12. Oie hay, hay zelenen'ky - love song from Central Ukraine
- Valery Golub: folk fiddle, Vasil Palanjuk: tsymbaly, Volodymyr Budz: sopilka, Volodymyr Biletsky: buben (frame drum), Yuri Berbenyuk: double bass, Valentyna Bogdanova: voice (soloist)
A young girl says: "I am pretty and grown-up and want to get married. My husband shall be young and handsome, diligent and willing to work. He shall smother me with caresses.

13. Pleskach - folk dance from Central Ukraine
- Valery Golub: folk fiddle, Vasil Palanjuk: tsymbaly, Volodymyr Budz: sopilka, Volodymyr Biletsky: buben (frame drum), Yuri Berbenyuk: double bass
The word "pleskach" derives from "pleskaty" and means "to clap ones hands".

14. Yak sluzhyv ya v pana - joking song from Central Ukraine
- Valery Golub: folk fiddle, Vasil Palanjuk: tsymbaly, Volodymyr Budz: accordion, Anatoliy Kurylo: voice (soloist), Volodymyr Biletsky: voice, buben (frame drum), Yuri Berbenyuk: double bass, Valentyna Bogdanova: voice (soloist)
I was a farmer's servant. For the first year the farmer payed me with a hen, for the second year with a duck, for the third year with a goose, for the fourth year with a turkey, for the fifth year with a mutton, for the sixth year with a calf and for the seventh year with a girl.

15. Hrechanyky - folk dance from Central Ukraine
- Valery Golub: folk fiddle, Vasil Palanjuk: tsymbaly, Volodymyr Budz: sopilka, Volodymyr Biletsky: buben (frame drum), Yuri Berbenyuk: double bass
Hrechanyky is the name of a small pie made of buckwheat.

16. Hopak - folk dance from Central Ukraine
- Valery Golub: folk fiddle, Vasil Palanjuk: tsymbaly, Volodymyr Budz: sopilka, Volodymyr Biletsky: buben (frame drum), Anatoliy Kurylo: drums, Yuri Berbenyuk: double bass
An improvised men's dance and also a contest for the single dancers. Who is able to combine the most varied figures (knee bend, jump, rotation, etc.; this dance was also performed with the sabre).

17. Da kosyv bat'ko - table song from the Poltava region
- Valentyna Bogdanova: voice (soloist), Anatoliy Kurylo, Volodymyr Biletsky, Ivan Volynets, Volodymyr Budz: voice
- Accompaniment: Vasil Palanjuk (spoons, bottles and washboard)
A girl loves a young man and says, "Come to see me on Sunday, and I will give you a nice embroidered shirt. Come to see me on Monday, and we will go together to look for the periwinkle (vinca minor, evergreen plant). Come to see me on Tuesday, and we will bind the sheaf.
- When a girl gives a shirt to a man, she agrees to marry him. The periwinkle is used to embellish the wedding dress.

18. Ivanku, ivanku - love song from Western Ukraine (Carpathian)
- Valery Golub: folk fiddle, Vasil Palanjuk: tsymbaly, drum, Volodymyr Budz: sopilka, Anatoliy Kurylo: voice (soloist), Yuri Berbenyuk: double bass, Valentyna Bogdanova: voice (soloist)
A girls is says to a man, "Come to see me today. I'll give you a sign, when my parents are away."

19. Kosarska - from the Carpathian region
- Volodymyr Budz: frilka (solo)
"Kosarska" means hay melody. It is a melody sung during hay making.

20. Do ney iduchy - from the Carpathian region
- Volodymyr Budz: frilka (solo)
"Do nei iduchy" means "going or walking to her".

21. Vid ney iduchy - from the Carpathian region
- Volodymyr Budz: frilka (solo)
"Vid nei iduchy" means "going or walking away from her".

22. Hutsuls'kiy nahrash (drymba) - from the Carpathian region
- Vasil Palanjuk: drymba - jew's harp (solo)

23. Velykodna melodiya - Easter melody from the Carpathian region
- Vasil Palanjuk: tylynka (solo)

24. Tantsyouvalna melodiya - dance melody from Central Ukraine
- Valery Golub: folk fiddle, Vasil Palanjuk: tsymbaly, Volodymyr Budz: sosulya (solo), Yuri Berbenyuk: double bass

25. Lemkivsky kolomiyky - dance melody from the Lemko region (Carpathian)
- Valery Golub: folk fiddle, Vasil Palanjuk: dvodenzivka (solo), drum, Volodymyr Budz: accordion, Yuri Berbenyuk: double bass
- The region in Southeastern Poland, where the Rusyn (Ruthenians) lived, was known as Lemko (today: Beskid Niski region). This mountain population, also called Rusyn and Ruthenians, speaks an Ukrainian dialect and belongs to the Greek-Orthodox Church, like the Boiks and Hutsuls. In their liturgical works they used the Cyrillic alphabet. After World War II they were resettled. Some of them returned to their old homeland. This region belonged to the Polish Kingdom of Galicia until the mid-14th century. From 1340 until 1772 it was completely annexed to Poland. After that until 1918, it belonged to Austria (hence the denomination "Ruthenians" for "Ukrainian") and then to the Austro-Hungarian Empire. Today it is again part of Poland.
*Ruthenians: a branch of East-Slavonic and Romanian people who migrated from the Walachy into the Carpathian region and spoke an Ukrainian dialect.
- Kolomyiky (kolomejka) means melody (also couplets* - wild dance of the men).
The name is deduced from the former city of Kolomya in the Ivano-Frankovsk region near Chernivtsi (Bukovina region). In this city, who formerly belonged to the Habsburg Monarchy, Ukrainians, Jews, Poles, and Germans were peacefully living together. There was spoken an Ukrainian dialect with loanwords from the Polish and German language.
*Couplet singing: historical songs, psalms (performed with an instrumental ensemble and the kobza (luth-like instrument)) or lyric songs with a strophic structure, kolyadky (praise songs), marches and other ritual folk-tunes in the form of the singing-dancing.

26. Viye viter - ballad from Central Ukraine
- Volodymyr Biletsky (solo), Ivan Volynets, Anatoliy Kurylo, Volodymyr Budz: voice
Guest: Ivan Tkalenko: bandura
A Cossack addresses the wind, "Tell me, wind, where is the Cossack's fate and his hope, where is the Cossack's glory and his freedom?"

27. Oie pozvol pan khazyan - praise song from Central Ukraine (koladka)
- Anatoliy Kurylo (solo), Valentyna Bogdanova, Volodymyr Biletsky, Ivan Volynets, Volodymyr Budz: voiceThis is a praise song for a man.

28. Ishla divon'ka - praise song from Central Ukraine (koladka)
- Valentyna Bogdanova (solo), Anatoliy Kurylo, Volodymyr Biletsky, Ivan Volynets, Volodymyr Budz: voice
- Volodymyr Budz: little bell
A young girl met three hay-makers and said, „You, my dear hay-makers, cut the grass and make hay for me. The first will get from me silk-grass, the second a golden ring, and the third will get me as his bride."

29. Nebo y zemlya - Christian song from Central Ukraine (koladka)
- Valentyna Bogdanova , Anatoliy Kurylo: (solo), Volodymyr Biletsky, Ivan Volynets, Volodymyr Budz: voice
Heaven and Earth celebrate today the birth of Christ.

30. Oie na richtsy na Yordany - Christian song from the Cherkasy region (koladka)
- Valentyna Bogdanova, Anatoliy Kurylo: (solo), Volodymyr Biletsky, Ivan Volynets, Volodymyr Budz: voice
The mother gave birth to her son at the river Jordan. Her son says to her, "Don't be frightened, you will be called mother of the whole world".



Das Repertoire des Ensembles umfasst traditionelle Lieder und Instrumentalwerke aus der Zentral- und Westukraine, d.h. mündlich überlieferte Volkslieder, die vom täglichen Leben erzählen, oder Lieder, die einen fixen Bestandteil der ganz typischen ukrainischen Zeremonien oder Feierlichkeiten darstellen, oder historische Lieder, Lieder der Kosaken und Balladen. Die Darbietung dieser Lieder erfolgt entweder polyphon oder als Solostück mit Instrumentalbegleitung.
Die Musiker spielen die folgenden traditionellen Instrumente: Sopilka (Schnabelflöte), Dvodenzivka (Doppel-Längsflöte), Tylynka (grosse Längsflöte aus Metall), Frilka (kleine Längsflöte aus Metall), Rrebro (Panflöte), Sosulya (Gefässflöte oder Kuckuck), tsymbaly (Hackbrett), Volksgeige, chromatisches Akkordeon, Drymba (Maultrommel), Bukhalo (Trommel), Buben (Rahmentrommel), Glöckchen, Löffel, Flaschen und Waschbrett.
Die Künstler von Khreshchaty Yar tragen für ihre Darbietungen lokale Kostüme, und in ihren Programmen finden sich Tänze, welche die lebendigen Traditionen sowie die grosse Vielfalt der ukrainischen Folklore widerspiegeln.
Obwohl viele verschiedene Völker durch den geographischen Raum der Ukraine gezogen sind, dort gelebt oder sogar geherrscht haben, gehört die Volksmusik der Ukraine zur slawischen Tradition. Die Vokalmusik ist hauptsächlich heterophon: Zwar ist der Gesang oft mehrstimmig, doch ist immer eine Stimme führend. Das reiche Repertoire umfasst viele berühmte Kosakenlieder und traditionelle Tänze. Diese Musik hat ihre Wurzeln in einer Jahrhunderte alten, oralen Tradition von Bylinen (Epen, erzählende Gedichte) und Duma, das sind lange, lyrische Balladen, in welchen die Heldentaten der Kosaken gerühmt werden.
Die Texte nehmen Bezug auf Geschichte, Landschaften, Charaktere und Eigenschaften der Bevölkerung. Auch Moral und Regeln des Zusammenlebens kommen zur Sprache. Sie stellen einen wahren Schatz dar, der bis zum heutigen Tage erhalten und konserviert wurde.
Die instrumentale ukrainische Volksmusik hat verschiedene Formen. Einerseits gibt es den Solovortrag auf der Sackpfeife, der Geige oder der Bandura usw., andererseits das Zusammenspiel etwa im traditionellen Trio, der so genannten "troista muzyka", welches hauptsächlich zum Tanz oder bei Umzügen aufspielt.
Charakteristisch für die traditionellen Tanzmusik-Gattungen ist ihre ethnische Zugehörigkeit und damit die klare Unterscheidung von regionalen oder lokalen Tanzformen: Kolomiyka (Ukrainische Karpaten und benachbarte Regionen), Hopak und Kossatschok (ganze Ukraine), Polka und volkstümliche Walzer (slawische und nicht slawische Traditionen des europäischen Gebiets). Die Einwirkung polnischer, tschechischer, slowakischer und ungarischer Folklore in den westlichen Gebieten (Karpaten) offenbart sich in der Rhythmik mit ihren stabilen Taktarten, während in den östlichen Regionen eine asymmetrische Rhythmik und asymmetrische Versmasse vorherrschen. In der südwestlichen Gegend der Karpaten (Region Bukowina) findet man Ähnlichkeiten mit moldawischer und rumänischer Instrumentalmusik.
Zur Instrumentalmusik, die nicht zum Tanz aufgespielt wird, gehört die improvisierte Musik der Hirten auf der Geige, der Sopilka (Längsflöte), auf der Trembita (etwa 3 Meter lange Form des Alphorns; eigentlich ein Signalinstrument der Hirten der Bergregionen, das auch bei Hochzeiten oder Begräbnissen Anwendung fand, zu Weihnachten wurden darauf auch Kolyadky, Weihnachtslieder, gespielt) oder auf der Drymba (Maultrommel). Grundlage der Improvisation bildeten meist Lieder.


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2727abcd
20.05.2010, 02:54
Меня очень интересует первый диск "Хрещатый Яр". Вы не могли бы выложить его на этом сайте или указать ссылку, где можно его скачать?

Заранее большое спасибо. Привет из Испании!

Darkman
20.05.2010, 09:54
спрошу того кто достал этот .. второй диск... (Ambrose из Германии...)

Уверен он брал его в местной библиотеке...
Если попрошу его ... и первый попадёцца когда нибудь.. - то возьмёт... - но иди знай типа..

vanterra
25.01.2013, 20:29
Здравствуйте Darkman

Можете ли вы дать ссылку на Khreshchaty Яр CD?